Log Shipping With dbatools – Part 4: Recover a Log Shipped Database

In the third part of the series we discussed the way to get the log shipping errors using the command “Get-DbaLogShippingError”. This blog will be about how to recover a log shipped database. Out-of-the-box solutions I can be very short in this paragraph, there is no out-of-the-box solution to recover a log shipped database. Why this command Initially, log shipping was meant to be used as a warm standby. You have your data on another instance but you still have some human intervention to get it all back up.

Log Shipping With dbatools – Part 3: Get Log Shipping Errors

In the second part of the series we discussed the way to test the log shipping status using the command “Test-DbaLogShippingStatus”. This blog will be about how to get log shipping errors to analyze why your log shipping isn’t working. Out-of-the-box solutions There are several options to get the log shipping errors right out of the box. One of them is using queries and the other one is the event viewer.

Log Shipping With dbatools - Part 2: Test Log Shipping Status

In the first part of the series I described the command Invoke-DbaLogShipping. This makes it possible to set up log shipping. This blog post will be about the command to test log shipping status. Before I describe the command, I want to discuss the options that are available in the SQL Server Management Studio (SSMS) and SQL Server. Out-of-the-box monitoring Microsoft has made it possible to check the log shipping using SSMS.

Log Shipping With dbatools - Part 1: Setup Log Shipping

This post is the first one of a series of four describing all the different commands. We’ll discuss the commands to set up log shipping with dbatools, how to check the status, to check for errors, and to recover in case of an emergency. What is log shipping Before we go into the why I want you to know what log shipping is. Log shipping dates back to the early versions of SQL Server.

T-SQL Tuesday #98 – Your Technical Challenges Conquered

T-SQL Tuesday is back around again and this time it’s the first one of 2018! This wonderful idea by Adam Machanic ( Blog | Twitter ), is this time hosted by Arun Sirpal ( Blog | Twitter ). The topic Arun has chosen is: Write about and share with the world a time when you faced a technical challenge that you overcame and you can go technical with both the issue and solution if you like.

Create Your Own PowerShell Profile

Being a fan of automation I like to create my own PowerShell profile. It enables me to load various settings that normally take more time. The PowerShell profile resides in your home directory and if you work in an AD environment with roaming data you’ll have the same profile on every computer. PowerShell profiles are not new and dates back to PowerShell v2.0. Others people have written about this subject before but I wanted to share my take on it.